Natasha & Ephraim Talk Team Unity

SOCBOX

Natasha & Ephraim have been friends since they were teenagers. In this interview, they talk about how they became friends, her background at Nordstrom and how she joined the company, what they appreciate about working with each other, and why team unity is one of our core values at SOCBOX.

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Video transcript

Natasha Herrera: “Ephraim was always taking care of people. He drove us everywhere.”

Ephraim Ebstein: “That’s true.”

NH: “We had a lot of fun when we were younger, but I do remember, he’s always had this entrepreneurial drive and I tell everybody—”

EE: “Here comes an embarrassing story”

NH: “—that he one time got me involved in a pyramid scheme. It was called Arrive by 25. We’re supposed to be millionaires at 25, but at least you arrived!” EE: “I didn’t arrive, I was 16! I didn’t know anything about business; that was like the first exposure I had.”

NH: “But ever since I’ve known him—”

EE: “It was so embarrassing, so embarrassing…”

NH: ”—you’ve been a hard worker. You’ve always had goals so…”

EE: “I drove, I was like the only guy with a license, in a VW bus, so that worked.”

NH: “So we, yeah, as long as I’ve known him, fun, but also driven.”

EE: “Yep.”

NH: “And what brought me here is that I really wanted a job after I had my daughter that pretty much gave me some really— it was challenging because I didn’t know anything about IT or cybersecurity, and it was closer to home and family.”

EE: “Tell them, tell them how I tried to get you to come to the company, you didn’t want to come.”

NH: “Yeah, DID NOT.”

EE: “She didn’t want to come, she was like, ‘No, I’m good. I’m happy.’ I was like, ‘okay, that’s no problem.’ Then later, I started interviewing someone else from Nordstrom.”

NH: “Yeah. I worked in Nordstrom for 14 years. I loved that job. I still love Nordstrom and…”

EE: “But suddenly you wanted the job.”

NH: “Yeah, he was interviewing someone else and I was like, ‘Maybe you should hire me.’ I don’t know if you planned that, but…”

EE: “What was that interview like?”

NH: “Yeah, it was a hard interview, becauseI didn’t think I was going to get the job.”

EE: “I made her sweat; I made her sweat on the interview. It was good.”

NH: “But I did get the job.”

EE: “She got the job.”

NH: “The first time that you interviewed me, when I called and I was like, ‘Do I want the job?’ you were like typing on your computer? I could hear the keys—”

EE: “You should feel this!”

NH: “—and I didn’t even, I didn’t even think that you were listening. When you were like ‘why now?’”

EE: “I was probably answering emails, I probably wasn’t listening.”

NH: “But yeah, but you still do that. You still need to work on listening to people when they call, and stuff like that, but that’s okay.”

EE: “I’m trying—”

NH: “You’re getting better.”

EE: “I’m working on it.”

EE: “Tasha was always fun, always bubbly, never drama. So it was always super fun hanging out with her and we had some good times. We’ve done a lot of cool stuff, and Tasha always had my back. She would go—like one time, we went snorkeling and she even, like, ended up having to be rescued with everyone else. I was always getting her into stuff but it was, it was pretty fun. And then she, once we got a little older, we both got married, kind of went different ways a little bit, but we still kept in contact, of course. And she started working at Nordstrom and—well no, first she worked at Home Depot. I think you wore overalls there, too.”

NH: “Yeah.”

EE: “And then she like, she worked a different job, but she went to Nordstrom and first she was like—”

NH: “Where I DIDN’T wear overalls!”

EE: “You didn’t wear overalls, and then she started dressing good once she was in Nordstrom. But then she started going up and up and I was like, ‘Man!’ Before I knew it, she was like Regional Manager, bossing people around and getting all this cool stuff done, working in L.A., so it was pretty good. So I knew she was good. I knew she was a hard worker. But of course, you know your friends; you got a lot of friends. You don’t know. Just because they’re your friends doesn’t mean that it’s gonna be a good, someone you want to work with in business, but—”

NH: “Yeah, I didn’t want to work with you either.”

EE: “Yeah, come on now. She wanted to work there. Anyway, then what happened was she was at Nordstrom. I knew she was good. And so I was trying to recruit her just because I had a sense that she was good in the business world too, but she didn’t want to come and finally she came over. So now it’s good. I will say this about her, she’s very— what I didn’t know was how good she was until she started working here because she’s super KPI-focused, super goal-driven and she likes to use data points a lot which is something I’m not as good at. So it’s pretty, it’s pretty awesome.”

NH: “I really appreciate my Nordstrom training.”

EE: “Yeah, it was good.”

NH: “So if you work at Nordstrom and you’re looking for a job as a salesperson—”

EE: “Apply! Yeah, click the link, apply here!”

NH: “What it’s like working with each other and working at FIT Solutions and SOCBOX, it’s a lot of—it is a lot of work and it’s actually fulfilling work because we’re constantly challenging ourselves. The thing that I just really like is that there’s nothing that we would ask our team to do that we wouldn’t do.”

EE: “Yeah.”

NH: “We are really focused on growing and making sure that the people that—We have a responsibility to people in the company and we do everything we possibly can to make sure that we take that responsibility seriously. So that’s what I like about working here. And then it kind of takes some of the values that I took from my old—the old companies I worked for, where you make the client happy, you always make the best decision that’s best for the client. And then you do what’s best for us. That’s how you retain really good people and the partnerships that we work with. So that made it easy for me to work here.”

EE: “Yeah. Yeah, I think for me, I really like the projects that we’ve been able to accomplish and the ones that we’re still working on. And everything we do is about solving the clients’ business problems and also really achieving our mission and vision as a company and taking care of our staff. So because it’s so quality-focused, it’s just really, really enjoyable, and it’s nice to work with somebody that is pulling in the same direction. I think we’ve all worked with people that, when you’ve not experienced that, but when you are experiencing it, just like it makes going to work fun—it makes it fun.”

NH: “We have a lot of fun here too.”

EE: “We got a lot of fun, yeah.”

NH: “We like to celebrate wins, we do a lot of thank you’s. We love to share good news about how our team is impressing our clients and they’re really hard workers, so yeah, it’s really fun working here.”

EE: “Yeah, it’s awesome.”

EE: “Oh, yeah. So one of the things we’re doing is writing down our goals: our personal, professional, and financial goals and aligning that with the business vision so that way everybody in the company is going the same way. And one of Tasha’s goals that she popped up with—tell them about your goal, it’s good.”

NH: “Our goal—one of my goals—was to make sure that me, Ramon, Joel, Ephraim, and our spouses all get to go to Italy and specifically, sip mimosas on the beach—”

EE: “Yeah!”

NH: “—in Italy, and we’re definitely gonna get there.”

EE: “Oh, I’m ready. I bought into that goal the first time I heard it. I’m like, ‘let’s do it! What are we waiting for? Let’s go.’

NH: “Yeah, we have the team that we could just basically relax and yeah—”

EE: “Yeah, yeah”

NH: “—and they can drive it. But that’s one of the goals that I had; why not? Let’s go to Italy.”

EE: “Yeah, let’s do it. Let’s do it.”

EE: “Okay, let’s go! Team unity! That’s probably one—of all the core values, probably that’s my favorite one. I like it because it just makes work fun, and you’re so effective. I always use the, I don’t know, like the illustration of the Spartan warriors fighting together, you know, it’s burned into my image. I don’t know.”

NH: “Yeah and they put their shields together.”

EE: “Yeah.”

NH: “And team unity is really high on the core values list because the majority of the time, when we’re offering solutions or if we’re moving or if we’re rowing in a certain direction, us communicating that vision and following through definitely doesn’t take just us.”

EE: “Yeah.”

NH: “Being part of that team, but having the whole team buy into it, and we wouldn’t be able to do that if we didn’t have the fantastic team that we have.”

EE: “Yeah. Yeah, and it’s hard. It’s easy to say like, ‘Team unity!’ and everyone gets behind it. But it’s really hard when things are difficult in the business and people aren’t necessarily on the same page—not on purpose, but because maybe everyone’s busy doing something and it’s easy to throw someone under the bus, but being able to be like, ‘That’s a great question. Let me get you information on that’— right? Taking responsibility, going to the team. We work it out. We make sure that we’re always delivering, solving a business problem for the customer and not kind of like stabbing each other. So yeah.”

NH: “Go team!”

EE: “Go team!”

 


Video transcript

Natasha Herrera: “Ephraim was always taking care of people. He drove us everywhere.”

Ephraim Ebstein: “That’s true.”

NH: “We had a lot of fun when we were younger, but I do remember, he’s always had this entrepreneurial drive and I tell everybody—”

EE: “Here comes an embarrassing story”

NH: “—that he one time got me involved in a pyramid scheme. It was called Arrive by 25. We’re supposed to be millionaires at 25, but at least you arrived!” EE: “I didn’t arrive, I was 16! I didn’t know anything about business; that was like the first exposure I had.”

NH: “But ever since I’ve known him—”

EE: “It was so embarrassing, so embarrassing…”

NH: ”—you’ve been a hard worker. You’ve always had goals so…”

EE: “I drove, I was like the only guy with a license, in a VW bus, so that worked.”

NH: “So we, yeah, as long as I’ve known him, fun, but also driven.”

EE: “Yep.”

NH: “And what brought me here is that I really wanted a job after I had my daughter that pretty much gave me some really— it was challenging because I didn’t know anything about IT or cybersecurity, and it was closer to home and family.”

EE: “Tell them, tell them how I tried to get you to come to the company, you didn’t want to come.”

NH: “Yeah, DID NOT.”

EE: “She didn’t want to come, she was like, ‘No, I’m good. I’m happy.’ I was like, ‘okay, that’s no problem.’ Then later, I started interviewing someone else from Nordstrom.”

NH: “Yeah. I worked in Nordstrom for 14 years. I loved that job. I still love Nordstrom and…”

EE: “But suddenly you wanted the job.”

NH: “Yeah, he was interviewing someone else and I was like, ‘Maybe you should hire me.’ I don’t know if you planned that, but…”

EE: “What was that interview like?”

NH: “Yeah, it was a hard interview, becauseI didn’t think I was going to get the job.”

EE: “I made her sweat; I made her sweat on the interview. It was good.”

NH: “But I did get the job.”

EE: “She got the job.”

NH: “The first time that you interviewed me, when I called and I was like, ‘Do I want the job?’ you were like typing on your computer? I could hear the keys—”

EE: “You should feel this!”

NH: “—and I didn’t even, I didn’t even think that you were listening. When you were like ‘why now?’”

EE: “I was probably answering emails, I probably wasn’t listening.”

NH: “But yeah, but you still do that. You still need to work on listening to people when they call, and stuff like that, but that’s okay.”

EE: “I’m trying—”

NH: “You’re getting better.”

EE: “I’m working on it.”

EE: “Tasha was always fun, always bubbly, never drama. So it was always super fun hanging out with her and we had some good times. We’ve done a lot of cool stuff, and Tasha always had my back. She would go—like one time, we went snorkeling and she even, like, ended up having to be rescued with everyone else. I was always getting her into stuff but it was, it was pretty fun. And then she, once we got a little older, we both got married, kind of went different ways a little bit, but we still kept in contact, of course. And she started working at Nordstrom and—well no, first she worked at Home Depot. I think you wore overalls there, too.”

NH: “Yeah.”

EE: “And then she like, she worked a different job, but she went to Nordstrom and first she was like—”

NH: “Where I DIDN’T wear overalls!”

EE: “You didn’t wear overalls, and then she started dressing good once she was in Nordstrom. But then she started going up and up and I was like, ‘Man!’ Before I knew it, she was like Regional Manager, bossing people around and getting all this cool stuff done, working in L.A., so it was pretty good. So I knew she was good. I knew she was a hard worker. But of course, you know your friends; you got a lot of friends. You don’t know. Just because they’re your friends doesn’t mean that it’s gonna be a good, someone you want to work with in business, but—”

NH: “Yeah, I didn’t want to work with you either.”

EE: “Yeah, come on now. She wanted to work there. Anyway, then what happened was she was at Nordstrom. I knew she was good. And so I was trying to recruit her just because I had a sense that she was good in the business world too, but she didn’t want to come and finally she came over. So now it’s good. I will say this about her, she’s very— what I didn’t know was how good she was until she started working here because she’s super KPI-focused, super goal-driven and she likes to use data points a lot which is something I’m not as good at. So it’s pretty, it’s pretty awesome.”

NH: “I really appreciate my Nordstrom training.”

EE: “Yeah, it was good.”

NH: “So if you work at Nordstrom and you’re looking for a job as a salesperson—”

EE: “Apply! Yeah, click the link, apply here!”

NH: “What it’s like working with each other and working at FIT Solutions and SOCBOX, it’s a lot of—it is a lot of work and it’s actually fulfilling work because we’re constantly challenging ourselves. The thing that I just really like is that there’s nothing that we would ask our team to do that we wouldn’t do.”

EE: “Yeah.”

NH: “We are really focused on growing and making sure that the people that—We have a responsibility to people in the company and we do everything we possibly can to make sure that we take that responsibility seriously. So that’s what I like about working here. And then it kind of takes some of the values that I took from my old—the old companies I worked for, where you make the client happy, you always make the best decision that’s best for the client. And then you do what’s best for us. That’s how you retain really good people and the partnerships that we work with. So that made it easy for me to work here.”

EE: “Yeah. Yeah, I think for me, I really like the projects that we’ve been able to accomplish and the ones that we’re still working on. And everything we do is about solving the clients’ business problems and also really achieving our mission and vision as a company and taking care of our staff. So because it’s so quality-focused, it’s just really, really enjoyable, and it’s nice to work with somebody that is pulling in the same direction. I think we’ve all worked with people that, when you’ve not experienced that, but when you are experiencing it, just like it makes going to work fun—it makes it fun.”

NH: “We have a lot of fun here too.”

EE: “We got a lot of fun, yeah.”

NH: “We like to celebrate wins, we do a lot of thank you’s. We love to share good news about how our team is impressing our clients and they’re really hard workers, so yeah, it’s really fun working here.”

EE: “Yeah, it’s awesome.”

EE: “Oh, yeah. So one of the things we’re doing is writing down our goals: our personal, professional, and financial goals and aligning that with the business vision so that way everybody in the company is going the same way. And one of Tasha’s goals that she popped up with—tell them about your goal, it’s good.”

NH: “Our goal—one of my goals—was to make sure that me, Ramon, Joel, Ephraim, and our spouses all get to go to Italy and specifically, sip mimosas on the beach—”

EE: “Yeah!”

NH: “—in Italy, and we’re definitely gonna get there.”

EE: “Oh, I’m ready. I bought into that goal the first time I heard it. I’m like, ‘let’s do it! What are we waiting for? Let’s go.’

NH: “Yeah, we have the team that we could just basically relax and yeah—”

EE: “Yeah, yeah”

NH: “—and they can drive it. But that’s one of the goals that I had; why not? Let’s go to Italy.”

EE: “Yeah, let’s do it. Let’s do it.”

EE: “Okay, let’s go! Team unity! That’s probably one—of all the core values, probably that’s my favorite one. I like it because it just makes work fun, and you’re so effective. I always use the, I don’t know, like the illustration of the Spartan warriors fighting together, you know, it’s burned into my image. I don’t know.”

NH: “Yeah and they put their shields together.”

EE: “Yeah.”

NH: “And team unity is really high on the core values list because the majority of the time, when we’re offering solutions or if we’re moving or if we’re rowing in a certain direction, us communicating that vision and following through definitely doesn’t take just us.”

EE: “Yeah.”

NH: “Being part of that team, but having the whole team buy into it, and we wouldn’t be able to do that if we didn’t have the fantastic team that we have.”

EE: “Yeah. Yeah, and it’s hard. It’s easy to say like, ‘Team unity!’ and everyone gets behind it. But it’s really hard when things are difficult in the business and people aren’t necessarily on the same page—not on purpose, but because maybe everyone’s busy doing something and it’s easy to throw someone under the bus, but being able to be like, ‘That’s a great question. Let me get you information on that’— right? Taking responsibility, going to the team. We work it out. We make sure that we’re always delivering, solving a business problem for the customer and not kind of like stabbing each other. So yeah.”

NH: “Go team!”

EE: “Go team!”